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Home Articles Sanskrit Roots And The Letter P

 

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“P” represents “purity” its seen in the Sanskrit “Pu” meaning “to cleanse” “to purify” this becomes the root of such Vedic nomenclature as “Puja” “Putra” “Punya” "Pura" "Purusha" and “Purva”. In Europe its reflected in the words “pure” “purge” “purgatory” “puritanical” and “purification”. The Indo/european "Pueu" is said to be the root of these words, however, close inspection makes it very doubtful that these words and their terminology could have come from anywhere else other than Sanskrit and the Vedas it represents.

“Puja” is a sacrificial rite where the elements of water, fire, air, flowers, incense, and food preparations are offered in a mood of devotion to the Supreme deity. “Puja” is formed from “Pu” meaning “to purify” and “Ja” meaning “to produce” hence “Puja” means “that which produces purity”. Observing the formation of these words, its philosophical meaning and its root "Pu" meaning "purity" one questions how they could come from anywhere but Sanskrit and the Vedic scriptures it represents.

 

“Putra” is the Sanskrit word which describes a “son” the “Pu” meaning “purity” the “Tra” meaning “to protect” as in one who “protects ones purity” and one who “protects one from hell”. By placing the ashes in a sacred place such as the Ganges and by performing various austerities recommended in the Vedas the parents can be relieved of unwanted karma accrued from their previous activities. Once again one wonders how this language could have come from anywhere but Sanskrit and the Vedas, and an even better question is why would anyone suggest an alternative source.

 

“It was in India, however, that there rose a body of knowledge which was destined to revolutionize European ideas about language. Panini Grammar taught Europeans to analyze speech forms, when one compared the constituent parts, the resemblances, which hitherto had been vaguely recognized, they could be set forth with certainty and precision." Renowned American linguist Leonard Bloomfield.

 

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“Punya” means “virtuous” “meritorious” “good work” “religious merit” for thousands of years the people of Vedic India have performed “Punya” as an offering to their ancestors to relieve them of unwanted karma and to bestow upon them “religious merit” and although “Punya” simply means “meritorious work” its usually performed to benefit others. “Pun” means “to gather” “to collect” “to heap together” “to accumulate” and “Ya” means “light” “fame” hence “Punya” means “to accumulate light” “to accumulate fame”.

 

Krsna in the Bhagavad Gita informs Arjuna " My dear Arjuna how have these impurities come upon you ? They are not at all befitting a man who knows the progressive values of life, they lead not to higher planets, but to infamy" Arjuna is refusing to do his duty as a warrior and Krsna is informing him his actions will lead to "infamy" the opposite of one who performs "Punya" whose meaning is to "accumulate ( pun ) everlasting fame ( ya )".

 

The great Devavrata undertook a lifelong vow of celibacy to please his father, an action which astonished even the Gods, they named him “Bhisma” he of the “terrible vow” an act which “gathered ( pun ) everlasting fame ( ya )” five thousand years later his story is still being told. Once again its difficult to imagine these words coming from a different language and a different culture, they are to Sanskrit and the Vedas as heat to fire, liquidity to water and sunshine to the Sun, such is its terminology, its linguistic structure and its purpose which is the "purification" of consciousness.

 

"The grammar of Panini stands supreme among the grammars of the world, alike for its precision of statement, and for its thorough analysis of the roots of the language and of the formative principles of words. By employing an algebraic terminology it attains a sharp succinctness unrivalled in brevity, but at times enigmatical. It arranges, in logical harmony, the whole phenomena which the Sanskrit language presents, and stands forth as one of the most splendid achievements of human invention and industry. So elaborate is the structure, that doubts have arisen whether its complex rules of formation and phonetic change, its polysyllabic derivatives, its ten conjugations with their multiform aorists and long array of tenses, could ever have been the spoken language of a people.” -  The Indian Empire Sir William Wilson Hunter p. 142)

 

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"Purva" means "that which spreads ( vah ) before us ( pur ) its the purifying light of the rising Sun and so "Purva" means "east". "Purva" also means "before" "in front" "prior" and this relationship between "Purva" meaning "east" and "Purva" meaning "before" reflects the oneness of the Sanskrit language and the ancient Vedic scriptures.

Veda describes the east as auspicious, temples are built facing the east, sacrificial rites are performed facing the east and marriage ceremonies are conducted facing the east. And so “Purva” meaning “east” also means “before” because “Purva” is in relation to the Vedas which recommend religious observances to be performed “before” “facing” “in front of” the “east” all of which are secondary meanings of “Purva”.

All of the cardinal points reflect this Sanskrit/Vedic relationship “Uttama” means “north” and also “left” the reason being that when facing “east” the “north” is on your “left”. “Dakshina” meaning “south” also means “right" the reason being that as one faces “east” the “south” is on your “right” and “Pazcima” meaning “west” also means “behind” and once again its related to the “east” as for one who faces the “east” the “west” is “behind” you. All Sanskrit words whose meaning and purpose are intrinsically related to the Vedas whose sacrificial rites are performed facing the "east" a principle which flavours the Sanskrit language.

 

All these Sanskrit words which express the Sanskrit root “Pu” are intrinsically related to the Vedas. “Puja” to “produce purity”, “Putra” to “protect purity” “Punya” to “accumulate light” “Purva” the light which “spreads before” “Purohita” the priest who “stands before” the fire “Pujari” the priest who performs the offering. Its a language which is intrinsically related to the Vedas, they cannot be separated and there is no evidence whatsoever that it came from any other source than Sanskrit and the Vedas.

 

"The Sanskrit grammarians of India were the first to analyze word forms, to recognize the difference between root and suffix, to determine the functions of suffixes and on the whole to elaborate a grammatical system so accurate and complete as to be unparalleled in any other country.” -  The renowned British Sanskrit scholar Arthur Anthony Macdonell (1854-1930)

 

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Brahminical life originally meant the forests and rivers where a combination of natures austerities and beauties were conducive towards spiritual progression. Ashrams wove their way along sacred rivers such as Yamuna, Ganga, Sarasvati, Godavari, Kaveri, thousands of ashrams, thousands of teachers and millions of students all dedicated to studying the Vedas.

 

“Water” was a central feature for Brahminical culture, three times a day they bathed “cleansing” and “purifying”, they performed acamana ( sipping water ) for “purification”, their food was cooked in the waters from these sacred rivers, and the natural flowing of the waters “purified” their minds. “Ap” is the Sanskrit for “water” the “A” meaning “beginning” the “P” meaning “purity” the ancients saw “water” as the “beginning of purification”.

 

“Ap” also means “work” the “A” meaning “action” the “P” meaning “purity” as in a “sacred act”, it was in relation to mans occupation within the ancient varnashrama system, the four social orders. In Europe “Ap” and “Apas” meaning “work” “sacred act” is seen in their word “opera” meaning “work” “activity” its seen in the word “opulence” and its also seen in “official” which means “duty” “service” the “P” became an “F” which is very common.

 

"It is true that even across the Himalayan barrier India has sent to the west, such gifts as grammar and logic, philosophy and fables, hypnotism and chess, and above all numerals and the decimal system.” Will Durant, American Historian.

 

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In ancient wisdom traditions “purity” and “protection” were seen as synonymous and this is seen in the root “Pa” meaning “to protect”. “Pa” becomes “Pati” whose meaning is “the performer of purification” and which is defined as the “lord” the “master” the “father”. If the father is pious and performs sacrificial rites the family is protected hence he is known as “Dampati” the “father ( pati ) of the house ( dam )”. In ancient times “Pati” was a name given to one who “protected” the family through the process of performing sacrificial rites and “purificatory” ceremonies.

 

“Pitr” means “father” its no different that “Pati” the “Tr” is a nominal suffix indicating that which performs a function. We see it in the Sanskrit “Datr” meaning to “perform the action ( Tr ) of giving ( Da )” and also “Yatr” one who “performs the action ( Tr ) of travelling ( Ya )” and so we have “Pitr” meaning “he who ( Tr ) purifies ( Pi )”. “Pitr” meaning “father” becomes  the Old Persian “Pita” the Latin “Pater” the Spanish “Padre” the Greek “Pater” and the German “Pater”. “Pitr” is also the source of the word “father” as it becomes the Latin “Pater” the “P” then becomes an “F” which is common and so “Pater” becomes “father”.

 

“Paternal” “Patrician” “Patron” “Patronym” “Patrinomy” “Cleopatra” “Patriarch” “Patronius” “Jupiter” “Compadre” “Patriot” are all related to this Sanskrit “Pitr” meaning “father”. “Pa” also becomes  “Pavana” meaning “purifier” and “cleansing” and it becomes “Pavitr” meaning “purifier” and so we can see how this letter “P” represents “purification”.

 

We have many other roots such as “pac” “paj” “pat” “pad” “pan” “pas” “pi” “piz” “pus” “puj” “pr” “pra” “pri” “pru” “plu” all of which are related to “purity”. The conclusion is twofold, one the letter “P” represents “purity” and two Sanskrit is a closed system comprising a set number of dhatus ( roots ) which has no need for anything outside of itself such as loan words, nor has the language evolved from anywhere but the Sanskrit system itself.

 

"Panini's grammar is the earliest scientific grammar in the world, the earliest extant grammar of any language, and one of the greatest ever written. It was the discovery of Sanskrit by the West, at the end of the 18th century, and the study of Indian methods of analyzing language that revolutionized our study of language and grammar, and gave rise to our science of comparative philology. The most striking feature of Sanskrit grammar is its objective resolution of speech and language into their component elements, and definition of the functions of these elements. Long before Panini (who names over sixty predecessors) the sounds represented by the letters of the alphabet had been arranged in an overly systematic form, vowels and diphthongs separated from mutes, semi-vowels, and sibilants, and the sounds in each group arranged according to places in the mouth where produced (gutturals, palatals, cerebrals, dentals, and labials). Words were analyzed into roots of which complex words grew by the addition of prefixes and suffixes. General rules were worked out, defining the conditions according to which consonants and vowels influence each other, undergo change, or drop out. The study of language in India was much more objective and scientific than in Greece or Rome. The interest was in empirical investigation of language, rather than philosophical and syntactical. Indian study of language was as objective as the dissection of a body by an anatomist.”  -  Walter Eugene Clark writes in The Legacy of India, p. 339-340

 

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Last Updated (Monday, 02 October 2017 07:46)

 
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"Therefore having a bona fide spiritual master and serving him and pleasing him and getting his mercy is essential. Otherwise there can be no advancement in Krishna consciousness. And unless the spiritual master is a pure devotee of Krishna then he has no potency to give you Krishna. He is simply a cheating rascal. So in fact above all the rules and regulations and offenses I have mentioned the most important thing, the essential thing, which is required if you want to come to the stage of purely chanting the Hare Krishna mantra is you must have a bona fide spiritual master who is a pure devotee of Krishna. Without having a bona fide spiritual master you can chant Hare Krishna forever but you will not be able to advance because Krishna does not reveal Himself in this way. He only reveals Himself to those devotees who surrender to and serve and please His pure devotees." (Srila Prabhupada letter to his London disciples, July, 1969)