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Home Articles Sanskrit And The Language Of Avestan

 

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The Magi would light their fires, chant their mantras and make their offerings to their God Ahura Mazda. They were the Old world order, priests of Zarathustra, teachers of Avesta, as the Brahmans were to India and the Druids to Europe so were the Magi to Persia and the Middle East. “Magi” means “priest” its source is the Sanskrit “maga” meaning “priest of the Sun” which then becomes the European words “magic” and “magician”. Zarathustra was their prophet, born into a family of animal traders, his name has been said to mean “one whose camels are old” the “ustra” reflects the Sanskrit “ustra” meaning “camel” and the “zara” seems to come from the Sanskrit “jara” meaning “old” which then becomes the European “geriatrics” and “gerentology".

 

Their object of worship, their supreme deity was Ahura Mazda, the “ahura” being the Sanskrit “asura” meaning “divine” the “mazda” being the Sanskrit “medha” meaning “wisdom" his name meaning “divine wisdom”. Their beginnings are said to go back some 3,500  -  6000 years ago and the names for their God, their prophet and their priest are all Sanskrit.

 

In his book “the science of language” Professor Max Muller writes “ It was more faithfully preserved by the Zoroastrians who migrated from India to the northwest and whose religion has been preserved to us in the Zind Avesta, though in fragments only. The Zoroastrians were a colony from northern India ”. The wisdom of the Magi was once a vast library of knowledge known as “Avesta” their language was called “Avestan” and below we can see how it is one and the same with Sanskrit.

 

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Iran was originally called "Aryan" its citizens were originally known as "Aryans" they were the centre of Avestan culture. “Arya” meaning “nobel” describes the character of a person and has no relation to skin colour nor geographical locations, its emphasis reflects the cultivation of spiritual knowledge. The etymology of “Arya” is “ar” meaning “to move” and “ya” meaning “advance” as in that which “moves (ar) in order to advance (ya)”. The dictionary defines “Arya” as “noble” “leader” “kind” “polite” “honourable” “wise” “master” “gentleman” and one who “behaves like an aryan”. The land which became known as Persia was once “Aryan” and the scriptures known as “Avesta” reflect this in their hymns.

 

" As the bright, glorious star Tishtrya moves on equally, so does the strong wind made by Mazda, and so the Glory of the Aryans ” " Ahura Mazda spoke unto Zarathushtra, saying, i made the Aryan Glory, rich in food, rich in flocks, rich in wealth and rich in Glory “ “ I bless the sacrifice and prayer and the strength and vigour of the Glory of the Aryans made by Mazda ”  -  all verses from the Ashtad Yasht of Avesta.

 

Upon the walls of a cliff face in Bagastan, Iran, we find the following " I am Darius the great King, King of Kings, King of many countries and many people, King of this expansive land, the Archaiemenid, son of a Persian, Aryan from the Aryan race ”. Herodotus the famous Greek historian writes “These (Medes and Persians) were called anciently by all people as the Aryans”.

 

This was the middle east some 2000 years ago, prior to the Greeks and Europeans naming the land “Persia” it was known as the Kingdom of the Aryans, an extension of Vedic India where even the name “Iran” is a corruption of the word “Aryan”. And Darius, the great King of Persia, even his name is Sanskrit “dharya” being Sanskrit for “holding” his name, as explained by academics is “holding firm the good”.

 

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The Gods of Avestan were the Gods of old, the ancient Gods, the Gods of the Vedas. The winds which blew across their land came from “Vayu” and “Vata” names drifting in from the ancient Veda. Their Sun appeared as “Vivahvant” and “Ushah” their Goddess of the dawn was none other than “Usas” of the Vedas accompanied by “Vivasvant”. The waters which covered the land, the vast seas were controlled by “Varuna” the same “Varuna” we find in the Vedas. “Yima” was the first to walk the earth, the great progenitor of the human race and the son of the Sun. In the Vedas “Yama” was the first to walk the earth, hes born from the Sun and hes the progenitor of the human race.

 

“Mithra” is the God of old, the God of Avesta, the God of the Vedas and the God of the Romans. In the Vedas he is worshipped as " the God who protects ( tra ) the borders ( mi ) " he is united with Varuna as he protects the borders of the sea and with Surya he represents morning and evening protecting the borders which divide day from night.

 

The stone tablets of Armana allow us to time travel to the Middle East some 3500 years ago to the times of Zarathustra. On one stone it speaks of a treaty between the prince of Mittani ( Northern Syria ) and the King of the Hittites ( Turkey ). At the end of the tablet the King calls as witness to his testimony “ The  Mitra gods, the Varuna gods, Indra, the Nasatya gods, Lord of Vasukhani, the mountains and rivers, the deities of heaven and the deities of earth “. 3500 years ago one of the most powerful Kingdoms of Western Asia invoke the Vedic Gods such as Mitra, Varuna, Indra and the twin Asvinis mentioned here as the Nasatya Gods. This not only reflects the Gods of Avesta it reflects the whole of the Middle East.

 

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The first month of the Avestan calendar is called “fravashi” meaning “first growth” its from the Sanskrit “pra” meaning “first” and “vaksatha” meaning “growth”. Summer begins with the month of “tishtrim starem” meaning “auspicious star” its from the Sanskrit “tishya” meaning “auspicious” and “str” meaning “star”. "Ameratat” is the month of “immortality” “deathless" its from the Sanskrit “amrta” meaning “immortal”. The sixth month is “khshathrem vairim” meaning  “power to rule at will” from the Sanskrit “ksatra” meaning “rule” and “vara” meaning “choice”. “Athro” is the ninth month meaning “the pure form of fire” from the Sanskrit “athar” meaning “fire” “atharvi” meaning “flame” and "atharvam” the priest of the sacrificial fire. The eleventh month is “vohu mano” meaning “superb mind/spirit” from the Sanskrit “vasu” meaning “great” and “mana” meaning “mind”. These are just a few, all of these months of the Avestan calendar are related to Sanskrit.

 

In Avestan the equinox is known as “hamas path madya” the “hamas” meaning “equal” is the Sanskrit “sama” meaning “equal” which in Europe becomes the word “same” and which also reflects a tendency of Avestan to replace a Sanskrit “s” with a “h”. “Madya” is simply the Sanskrit “madhya” meaning “middle” from which we get the European “middle” and “medium” and “path” is the Sanskrit “patha” meaning “path” “course” “direction” “road" from which comes the European “path” and “pathway”. “Hamas path madya” describes the sun as it crosses ( path ) the equator ( madya ) dividing day and night equally ( hama ) and distributing sunshine equally between the north and southern hemispheres.

 

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Professor Johan Hendrik Caspar Kern wrote a book entitled "about the word Zarathustra" in it he says " The Bactrian ( Avesta ) is so greatly related to the old Indian language and in particular that of the Vedas that without exageration it can be called a dialect thereof ". Professor Kern gives the following examples of how close the languages actually are by citing verses from Avesta and how they would read in Sanskrit.

 

Avesta  -  "Yo yatha puthrem taurunam, haomem vandaeta mashyo, fra abyo tanubyo, haomo visaite baeshazai"  -  Sansnkrit - "Yo yatha putram tarunam, samam vandeta martyah, pra abhyas tanubhyah, somo visate bhesajaya"  -  Avesta  -  "Aevo pantao yo ashahe vispe anyaesham apantam"  -  Sanskrit  -  "Abade pantha he ashae visha anyaesham apantham".

 

Both languages are the same, as Professor Kern says Avestan is a dialect of Sanskrit. These verses are known as "gathas" which reflects the Sanskrit "gatha" meaning the same. They come from the Avesta "yasna" meaning "sacrifice" which is the Sanskrit "yajna" meaning "sacrifice". Other texts are the "videvdat" which is the Sanskrit "vi - deva - datta" the "vi" meaning "opposing" or "against" "Deva" means the "Gods" and "Datta" means "protected". The videvdat are a collection of texts which are meant to protect you against the demons whom they describe here as "Devas". The struggle between the Devas and the demons is an eternal one and although the Devas represent dharma and righteousness, its not always so black and white and in some ways the scriptures of Avesta seem to reflect this.

 

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The celestial ocean known as “Vourukasha” is the ocean of Avestan from which all of the worlds rivers emerge. “Vour-ukasha” is none other than the Vedic “akasa” meaning “sky” “ether” “heaven” “space” its that from which the various elements come such as earth, water, fire, air and ether, the substance of the cosmos. From this “Vourukasha” comes “Haravati” the river Goddess of Avesta. “Haravati” is none other than the great Vedic river Goddess “Sarasvati” once again highlighting how a Sanskrit “S” becomes an “H” in Avestan and this is also seen in their other river “Harayu” which is the Vedic “Sarayu”.

 

“Sarasvati” is “sara” meaning “waters” and “vati” which apparently means “having” her name meaning “she who possesses waters”. In Avesta she is also known as “Aredvi Sura Anahita” the guardian of the waters. Although somewhat obscure “aredvi” seems to have been “Arya Devi” meaning the “Aryan Goddess” the “sura” is Sanskrit its etymology being “su” meaning “good” “great” and “ra” meaning “yielding” “possessing” “granting” “bestowing” and so “sura” means “one who possesses greatness”. “Anahita” is the Sanskrit “an” meaning “not” and “ahita” means “unclean” her name means “immaculate” “pure”.

 

In Avesta “Apam Napat” means “son of the waters” in Sanskrit “Apam Napat” means “son of the waters”. “Apam” is the Sanskrit “apa” meaning “water” and “napat” is Sanskrit for “offspring” “son” “grandson” “granddaughter” its etymology is “na” meaning “waters” and “pat” meaning “to govern” it describes “Varuna” the great personality who “governs the waters” and who is described in both the Rig Veda and Avesta as “Apam Napat” the “son of the waters”. This “napat” is seen as the English “nephew” the word “nepotism” and its also related to the God of the sea “Neptune”. “Apam Napat” is mentioned in Avesta as “acting with Mitra for the good of society”. Mitra is the close associate of Varuna, he protects the borders of the sea the etymology of his name being “mi” meaning “borders” and “tra” meaning to “protect” as in “one who protects the borders” he performs the same service with Surya the Sun God where he appears as morning and evening protecting the borders which divide day from night.

 

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3000 years ago the main influence throughout what came to be known as Persia was the philosophy of Zoroastrianism, who worshipped Ahaura Mazda through the medium of fire. Fire was not their God, fire was the purifying medium through which their offerings were made just as the Brahmans made their offerings to Visnu through the purifying medium of Agni, the God of fire. The cultural centre of this powerful religion was Iran which was then called “Aryan” reflecting the Aryan Kingdom it was part of and this culture of Zoroastra covered Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Iraq, Azerbaijan and what became the greater Kingdom of Armenia. Like everything however, it has its source, Professor Max Muller says "The Zoroastrians were a colony from northern India” and Professor Johan Hendrik Caspar Kern says " The Bactrian ( Avesta ) is so greatly related to the old Indian language and in particular that of the Vedas that without exageration it can be called a dialect thereof “. As the ancient Greco/roman civilisation was destroyed by Christianity so the ancient culture which once pervaded the middle east has been replaced by Islam and just as the Greco/roman culture reflects the ancient Vedic culture so did the religion of Zoroastra, indeed the further we go back in time the more the world becomes Vedic.

 

“The original name of the Indo/Iranian Goddess was Sarasvati “she who possesses waters”. In India she continued to be worshipped by this name, which she gave there to a small but very holy river in Madhyadesa (Punjab) whereas in Iran Sarasvati became, by normal sound changes, Harahvati, a name preserved in the region called in Avestan Harakhvaiti and known to the Greeks as Anacosia, a region rich in rivers and lakes. Originally, Harahvati was the personification of the great river which flows down from the high Hara into the sea Vourukasa, and is the source of all the waters of the world, and just as the wandering Iranians  called the great mountains near which they lived Hara, they gave Harahvaitis name to the life giving rivers and their Indian cousins did the same”. A history of Zoroastrianism  the early period  -   Mary Boyce.

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Last Updated (Friday, 07 July 2017 16:25)

 
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